ECB Preview (European Central Bank)


ECB says more to go on normalisation after 75 bps hike in October

LATEST ECB MEASURES TO BATTLE INFLATION

ECB’s de Guindos: Must continue to monitor underlying inflation

Make virtual opening remarks at XIII Encuentro Financiero on Tuesday, European Central Bank (ECB) Vice President Luis de Guindos noted that the central bank must continue to monitor underlying inflation. Speaking at a financial event in Milan last week, de Guindos said "for the headline (inflation) ... I think that we're there in terms of the peak, perhaps one decimal point up or down, it will be hovering, but I think that in the first half of next year we will see a decline.”

ECB’s Kazimir: Risk of recession in Eurozone is growing

While presenting the financial stability report on Monday, European Central Bank (ECB) policymaker and Slovak central bank President Peter Kazimir said that the “risk of recession in the Eurozone is growing.” “Rise in interest rates to continue despite unfavorable economic developments,” he added.

ECB latest analysis

ECB LATEST NEWS


OCTOBER MEETING REVIEW


SEPTEMBER MEETING REVIEW

Breaking: ECB hikes key rates by 75 basis points as expected

The ECB announced on Thursday that it raised its key rates by 75 basis points (bps) following the September policy meeting as expected. With this decision, the interest rate on the main refinancing operations and the interest rates on the marginal lending facility and the deposit facility will be increased to 1.25%, 1.5% and 0.75% respectively.


July MEETING REVIEW

Breaking: ECB hikes key rates by 50 basis points in July

The European Central Bank (ECB) announced on Thursday that it raised its key rates by 50 basis points (bps) following the July policy meeting. Markets were expecting the bank to hike its rates by 25 bps. The bank also announced that the Governing Council approved the new anti-fragmentation tool titled "Transmission Protection Instrument (TPI)."


June MEETING REVIEW


APRIL MEETING REVIEW



MARCH MEETING REVIEW


February meeting review

Breaking: ECB leaves rates unchanged, maintains guidance on interest rates and QE

The European Central Bank opted to leave its deposit rate unchanged at -0.5% on Thursday as unanimously expected. The bank maintained its guidance on interest rates, saying they would remain at present or lower levels until the conditions for a rate hike have been met. The bank also reaffirmed its QE policy guidance from December; that the PEPP will end in March, that in Q2 the APP will be lifted to EUR 40B per month, then tapered back to EUR 20B per month by Q4, while PEPP reinvestments will continue to the end of 2024.

November meeting review


September meeting review

Top Broker

Related content



Related content

Editors' picks

EUR/USD falls below 1.0500 after US NFP data

EUR/USD falls below 1.0500 after US NFP data

EUR/USD dropped below 1.0450 but managed to stage a modest rebound. The US Dollar preserves its strength against its rivals and doesn't allow the pair to gain traction after the data from the US showed that Nonfarm Payrolls rose by 263,000 in November.

EUR/USD News

GBP/USD turns south on upbeat US jobs report, trades below 1.2200

GBP/USD turns south on upbeat US jobs report, trades below 1.2200

GBP/USD lost nearly 100 pips with the immediate reaction to the upbeat November jobs report from the US and broke below 1.2200. The US Dollar Index clings to strong daily gains above 105.00 after the data showed that Nonfarm Payrolls rose by 263,000.

GBPUSD News

Gold retreats below $1,790 as US yields surge on US NFP

Gold retreats below $1,790 as US yields surge on US NFP

Gold price turned south and dropped below $1,790 in the early American session. The benchmark 10-year US Treasury bond yield is up more than 2% on the day near 3.6% after the bigger-than-expected November job growth, weighing heavily on XAU/USD.

Gold News

FTX exchange collapse, loss of $3.1 billion could have been avoided on one condition

FTX exchange collapse, loss of $3.1 billion could have been avoided on one condition

FTX exchange, founded by Samuel Bankman-Fried (SBF), has consistently made headlines over the past month for its liquidity crisis and triggering a collapse in the crypto ecosystem.

Read more

AMC advances more than 3% in premarket day after being halted

AMC advances more than 3% in premarket day after being halted

AMC stock is up 3.4% in Friday's premarket just a day after authorities halted trading due to unusual volatility. Thursday saw options volume three times higher than the 20-day average.

Read more

Majors

Cryptocurrencies

Signatures


Big Picture

what is the ECB?

The European Central Bank is the central bank empowered to manage monetary policy for the Eurozone. With its beginnings in Germany 1998, the ECB is empowered to maintain price stability in the euro area, so that the euro’s purchasing power is not eroded by inflation. As an entity independent of individual EU countries and EU institutions, the ECB aims to ensure that the year-on-year increase in consumer prices is less than, but close to 2% over the medium term. Another of its tasks is the one of controlling the money supply. This involves, for example, setting interest rates throughout the euro area. The European Central Bank’s work is organized via the following decision-making bodies: the Executive Board, the Governing Council and the General Council. Christine Lagarde is the President of this organism since November 1st 2019. Her speeches, statements and declarations are an important source of volatility, especially for the Euro and the currencies traded against the European currency. 

who is ECB's President?

Christine Lagarde was born in 1956 in Paris, France. Graduated from Paris West University Nanterre La Défense and became President of the European Central Bank in November 1st 2019. Prior to that, she served as Chairman and Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund between 2011 and 2019. Lagarde previously held various senior ministerial posts in the Government of France: she was Minister of the Economy, Finance and Industry (2007–2011), Minister of Agriculture and Fishing (2007) and Minister of Commerce (2005–2007). 

Christine Lagarde

Lagarde on her Profile and Wikipedia

How to Trade the ECB Rate Decision

Prior to the Rate Decision:

  • Many traders buy the rumors and square their positions shortly after the decision is made. For instance, if the market believes that the European Central Bank will hike the rate; traders buy the Euro and close the position shortly after the announcement. On the other hand, if the expectation is a rate decrease, traders will short the Euro and square the position after the announcement.

After the Rate Decision:

  • If the market’s expectations differ from the actual rate decision there can be some excellent trading opportunities.
  • If the market is expecting a rate hike, but the European Central Bank ends up cutting the interest rate, a short 1-2 hour trade selling the Euro may prove successful.
  • If the market expects a rate cut, but the ECB comes in with an increase in the rate, a trader may want to place a short long position on the Euro for 1-2 hours.


hike, low or mantain interest rates

The decision always has an effect on the Euro.

When the interest rate is increased the European Central Bank is literally selling government securities to large financial firms. In turn, the financial organizations are paying in Euros for these securities. This effectively decreases the amount of currency circulating in the economy. A decreasing supply leads to higher demand, and therefore causes the value of the Euro to appreciate.

When the interest rates are decreased, the European Central Bank floods the market with Euros. This is done by the purchasing government securities from financial organizations. In return for the securities, these banks and financial deals are paid in Euros, therefore increasing the supply of Euros in the economy. As supply increases, the value of the Euros depreciates.

the world interest rates table

The World Interest Rates Table reflects the current interest rates of the main countries around the world, set by their respective Central Banks. Rates typically reflect the health of individual economies, as in a perfect scenario, Central Banks tend to rise rates when the economy is growing and therefore instigate inflation.

some concepts you need to know

In practical terms, QE means that central banks create money out of nothing to buy securities, such as government bonds. This new money swells the size of bank reserves by the quantity of assets purchased and that’s why this programme is called Quantitative Easings. The money supply is intended to flood financial institutions with capital in an effort to stimulate lending and increase liquidity.

Much of the governments’ debt is held by banks in the Eurozone and the ECB wants them to give more credits. If the European Central Bank buys government bonds, their prices rise and profitability drop even more. This is a liquidity-providing operation that weakens the value of the euro. This depreciation makes European exports cheaper and competitive, and ultimately, helps in recovering. In addition, as a result of the stimulus to internal and external consumption, the ECB combats the risk of deflation, a widespread and prolonged drop in prices, as well as the high unemployment.

The long term refinancing operation (LTRO) is a cheap loan scheme for European banks that was announced by the European Central Bank towards the end of 2011 in a bid to help ease the eurozone crisis.

Round one was carried out on 21 December, when banks took €489 billion from the European Central Bank. The loans are due to be repaid within three years at a rate of 1%, and a second round will be launched on 28 February, with the results of how much money was requested due on 29 February.

As the eurozone crisis has escalated, banks have become less stable and have less money to lend. The objective of the LTRO is to boost cash flow in the market and avoid a severe credit crunch or collapse of the banking system.