In the first part, we analyzed the HIV/AIDS pandemic, as the most deadly pandemic since the 1971, and the SARS pandemic, as the most similar to the current COVID-19 pandemic. However, we have witnessed several other pandemics in the recent decades. Let’s investigate them now and draw conclusions for the global economy and the gold market.

Let’s start with the epidemic of 2009 A/H1N1 flu, called also the swine flu. It originated in pigs from central Mexico and lasted from early 2009 to late 2010. It was highly contagious, as around 1.66 billion of people, or 24 percent of the then global population, contracted the illness. Luckily, the case-fatality rate was very small, around 0.001-0.0035 percent, which resulted in an estimated range of deaths from between 151,700 and 575,400 people, around 10 times higher than the first estimates based on the number of cases confirmed by lab tests. The peak of interest in the swine flu occurred in April 2009, while the number of cases peaked in June 2009. As one can see in the chart below, the price of gold did not rally to the hysteria about the swine flu. It is true that gold started in mid-2009 its great bull market, but the rally came after the peak in the swine flu outbreak, so it seems that it was rather a reaction to the Great Recession and the Fed’s quantitative easing.

Chart 1: Gold prices during swine flu pandemic (London P.M. Fix, in $).

Gold

The next pandemic originated in 2012 in the Middle East, so it was named Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). Just like the COVID-19 and SARS, the MERS was caused by the virus from the coronavirus group. It was likely transmitted to humans through camels and was much more dangerous than the swine flu, as its fatality rate was 34 percent. However, only 2,506 cases and 862 deaths were reported from 2012 to January 15, 2020. The peak of infection and the peak of interest occurred in April – May 2014. As the chart below shows, gold prices actually declined during the peak of MERS pandemic, which was probably caused by the limited geographical scope – the majority of cases were reported from Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Chart 2: Gold prices during MERS pandemic (London P.M. Fix, in $).

Gold

Another recent pandemic was the West African Ebola virus. It originated in December 2013 in Guinea and lasted until 2016. According to the official data, there were a total of 28,646 suspected, probable and confirmed cases and 11,323 deaths (case-fatality rate of 39.5 percent), but the WHO suspects that the true number may be higher. The interest in Ebola virus started to rally in summer 2014 and remained elevated through the whole year, with the culmination in October. But as the chart below shows, gold prices decreased in that period. The probable reason of the gold’s bearish reaction is the fact that the pandemic was contained to, as the name suggests, West Africa (mainly in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone), which is neither the major financial center nor the industrial center, like China is.

Chart 3: Gold prices during Ebola pandemic (London P.M. Fix, in $).

Gold

The next pandemic was the Zika fever caused by Zika virus in Brazil that started in March 2015. In November 2016, the WHO announced that Zika is no longer a public health emergency of international concern. It was estimated that 1.5 million people were infected by Zika in Brazil, with over 3,500 cases of microcephaly reported between October 2015 and January 2016. The interest in Zika virus started to rally in January 2016 and remained elevated through the whole year, with peaks in February and then again albeit lower in August.

The price of gold also started to rally in January 2016, as the chart below shows. However, it’s rather a coincidence as the more detailed analysis does not show the positive correlation between the gold prices and the interest in the Zika virus. For example, the latter plunged in March, but gold prices did not – there was a correction, but not a plunge. And despite the downward trend in the number of cases and the interest in the Zika virus, the price of gold generally was going upwards until September hawkish FOMC meeting. Gold’s performance was driven more by the macroeconomic evens such as the introduction of the NIRP by the Bank of Japan in January 2016.

Chart 4: Gold prices during Zika pandemic (London P.M. Fix, in $).

Gold

Summing up, gold does not always react positively to pandemics. In some cases (MERS and Ebola), the price of the yellow metal even declined! It confirms our view that in the long-run, geopolitical drivers and all sorts of natural disasters are less important to the gold market than macroeconomic or fundamental factors. Gold is especially unmoved when the epidemic is geographically contained and it does not affect significantly the developed countries and the world’s economy. As we often repeat, geopolitical events move the gold market the most significantly when they affect directly the US or the global economy.

Thus, our historical analysis implies that the current outbreak of COVID-19does not have to provide a sustained rally in the gold prices. Of course, this time may be different. This is because the new coronavirus originated in China, which is now an important part of the global economy and a major industrial center strongly linked through the supply chains with the US and European companies. But investors should not give in to fear – although in previous pandemics the stock market always plunged initially, it quickly gave way to a recovery and significant gains. It implies that the recent shift towards the safe-havens assets such as gold may reverse later in the future… unless the Fed chickens out and eases its monetary policy, which – given the recent spread of the coronavirus to the Europe and the US – has become more likely.  

 


 

Want free follow-ups to the above article and details not available to 99%+ investors? Sign up to our free newsletter today!

 

All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' employees and associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be a subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses were based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are believed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.

Analysis feed

FXStreet Trading Signals now available!

Access to real-time signals, community and guidance now!


Latest Forex Analysis

Editors’ Picks

EUR/USD chops around amid end-of-month flows, ahead of Trump

EUR/USD is battling 1.11, close to the two-month highs amid choppy trading. Hopes for a fiscal boost in Europe and mixed satisfactory data have supported the currency pair. , Sino-American tensions are rising and investors await President Trump's China announcement.

EUR/USD News

GBP/USD advances amid US dollar weakness, shrugging off concerns

GBP/USD is trading above 1.23, edging higher amid US dollar weakness and Britain's gradual reopening. Intensifying Sino-American tensions and the Brexit impasse are ignored. 

GBP/USD News

Cryptocurrencies: $348M in matured derivatives boost the market

Futures and options contracts' expiration brings a wave of volatility to the crypto market. Ethereum takes advantage and attacks resistances in the market dominance chart, Bitcoin goes back. Ripple disappoints despite regaining the third place in market capitalization.

Read more

Canada's economy falls by 8.2% annualized in Q1, better than expected, USD/CAD shakes

The Canadian economy squeezed by an annualized rate of 8.2% in the first quarter of 2020, better than -10% expected. Quarterly, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) squeezed by 2.1%. Most of the downfall occurred in March, with a drop of 7.2%, better than 8.5% projected. 

Read more

WTI drops 4% and eyes $32 mark amid risk-off, weakening demand

The selling pressure around WTI (July futures on Nymex) accelerates following the break below the 33 level, as bears now target the 32 support zone heading into the key US macro data and US President Donald Trump’s response to the Hong Kong issue.

Oil News

Forex Majors

Cryptocurrencies

Signatures