The gold and silver futures markets were designed to increase volatility and discourage physical ownership of precious metals, as revealed in 1970s-era disclosures. The futures markets have also created opportunities for manipulation.

Today, the corruption is on full display for anyone who cares to look at the Wiki-Leaks documents, criminal prosecutions, and the other piles of evidence detailing foul play.

Yet the global price for precious metals is still set by these futures markets. And the trading volume has even grown, even as prices appear increasingly unhinged from fundamental drivers impacting supply and demand for the underlying metals.

High frequency and algorithmic trading is now dominant.

Why these markets continue to function as the primary mechanism for price discovery, given they are a playground for criminals, is a reasonable question.

Futures markets are used for honest hedging (and honest speculation). Gold and silver producers, refiners, and other interested parties buy and sell contracts to help assure profits or control losses associated with major price swings.

It is easy to understand why a mining company might want some certainty as to the price of the metal in the near term, but it is hard to understand why they put up with the longer-term effects of participating in questionable exchanges.

Counting on a fair shake from the criminal enterprises which play a market-making role in futures doesn’t seem like a good plan. And it’s ironic to see participants trying to manage volatility using a market which was designed to increase volatility.

The other reasons as to why these markets continue to operate are less than legitimate. They are a great mechanism for bankers and regulators to control the price and demoralize gold bugs.

Plenty of speculative longs are still willing to play in the rigged casino. A constant stream of capital comes in from speculators who are lured by the great fundamentals for gold and silver and hopes of a big payday if their highly levered bets pay off.

Some of these people are blissfully unaware the game they are playing in is crooked. Others know there is cheating. They believe they understand their adversaries and plan to get out of long positions before the bankers orchestrate the next price smash.

It’s not likely the current crop of bankers, politicians and bureaucrats will clean up the act.

Absent some sort of big regulatory overhaul and a functioning justice system to hold crooked bankers accountable, the solution is for more investors to leave the futures exchanges and go into the physical market instead.

Money Metals Exchange and its staff do not act as personal investment advisors for any specific individual. Nor do we advocate the purchase or sale of any regulated security listed on any exchange for any specific individual. Readers and customers should be aware that, although our track record is excellent, investment markets have inherent risks and there can be no guarantee of future profits. Likewise, our past performance does not assure the same future. You are responsible for your investment decisions, and they should be made in consultation with your own advisors. By purchasing through Money Metals, you understand our company not responsible for any losses caused by your investment decisions, nor do we have any claim to any market gains you may enjoy. This Website is provided “as is,” and Money Metals disclaims all warranties (express or implied) and any and all responsibility or liability for the accuracy, legality, reliability, or availability of any content on the Website.

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